Do you want to be a superhero?


Do you want to be a superhero?

If you use the powers that you already have to their fullest potential, you will likely find that you have more than you need to make a real & lasting positive difference.

Superpowers are not required.

Want to make a positive difference in the world? Start now & lead by example.



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True wealth is traded in kindness and positive energy.

Excerpt from: What it means to be truly wealthy


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Kindness is like an ember that starts a wildfire

Excerpt from: A single act of kindness

A single act of kindness may seem like such a small thing, but so is the ember that starts a wildfire.


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Dealing with disapproval


If you spend your time being the best person that you can be, there’s no need to concern yourself with those who may disapprove of how you live your life.



The strength in tolerance and kindness

Excerpt from: my book series

There’s nothing wimpy or weak about being kind or tolerant of others.

Quite the opposite, really.

Patience and tolerance are often indicative of self-control.

Reflexive anger, hate, and aggression — on the other hand — represent a lack of self-control and often lead one to undesirable consequences.

In the hands of someone with mental discipline, the unrestrained anger and aggression of others can often be used against them.

If you can’t control yourself — the one and only person you truly have any control over — you may appear strong in the moment, but it isn’t real power, it’s weakness.

Self-discipline is a key to many doors. Not least of which is one that leads to a better, stronger, and healthier version of yourself.

If the results of your habits don’t make you a better, stronger, or healthier person, it’s time to consider new habits that do.

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A magical question

Excerpt from: Is there anything I can do to help?

"Is there anything I can do to help?" is a magical question.

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“Is there anything I can do to help?” is a magical question.

(Use it often to show you care.)

See also: Is there anything I can do to help (if so, contact me)


A person of value


One adds far more value to their life by contributing something of value to other people’s lives than they do by seeking to benefit only their own.

Collect value by contributing value.

“Try not to become a [person] of success. Rather become a [person] of value.” — Albert Einstein


True Beauty

We live in a culture where it’s far easier to gain admiration for looking good than it is for doing good.

Just look at any magazine stand and it’s easy to see that society reflects our worship of good looks by putting more emphasis on those who are beautiful than on those who are making a real contribution.

Isn’t it time we pay attention less to genetic lottery winners with little more ambition than to gain attention for being attractive and pay more attention to the truly beautiful people going out of their way to add real value to people’s lives?

Because people are rarely as beautiful as when they act selflessly and perform an act of kindness for no other reason than to make a positive difference.

True beauty has far more to do with what kind of value a person adds to the people and places they encounter in life than it does with being physically attractive.

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The value in difficult people

In the same way that the hardest lessons we learn in life are often the most valuable, so, too, are the difficult people we meet along the way.

Even the unfriendliest and most challenging person we cross paths with has something of value to teach us about ourselves.

Sometimes we need to learn patience. Sometimes it’s self-discipline. Sometimes it’s to not let other people have so much control over our thoughts, feelings, and emotions.

Whatever it may be, the people we find particularly challenging are valuable because they can instantly highlight weaknesses in our self-control. They can trigger us to think, act, or behave in such a way that isn’t congruent with the type of person we want to be.

But every experience we have in life — whether we choose to label it as “good” or “bad” — is an opportunity for growth. And every encounter we have with difficult people provides us with an opportunity to identify the things we need to work on in order to close the gaps between the person we are and the person we want to be.

“Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” — Victor Frankl

A key to surviving experiences with difficult people — without being brought to the brink of behaving badly — is to remember that we may not always know what to do, but we can always choose the type of person we want to be.

And, with practice, we can choose to refuse to let others cause us to act in a way that is in direct conflict with the person we picture ourselves as.

And we can create the frame of mind necessary to do this by choosing to see the value in the negative people we encounter in life by actively using our experiences with them in such a way that we become not bitter, but better.



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